Sheraton Plaza Hotel

Discuss new retail, dining, business and residential projects within the City of Clayton, the center of St. Louis County government.
A nearly $20 million renovation is planned by Silverwest Hotels for this property. HOK is leading the design process. This renovation will include...
  • Reskinning of the building to make it glassier and cleaner.
  • Removal of covered pool for an outdoor pool deck.
  • New Porte-cochere
  • Complete renovation of the hotel rooms and lobby
My story: https://www.cityscene-stl.com/news/clay ... ore-modern

The renderings look good.
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Current state of the building.
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I'm not a fan of re-skinning buildings. We lose the historical progression of design. What's unpopular today will be popular again in 40 years, and they'll just have to restore the original, historical facade; just like we're doing today on so many buildings that were re-skinned in mid-century. Can't we ever learn?
I disagree. The current design is not an example of enduring mid century architecture.

I like the proposal.
I like the windows in the new renderings, but I’d argue that the current facade looks “cleaner” than the modernized version- not sure why those accentuated horizontal lines between certain floors are necessary. In my opinion, it interrupts the skyward rhythm of the facade and makes the building look shorter. As Clayton’s skyline continues to expand, I think early specimens like this one from the first wave of high-rise construction provide context and contrast amidst an ever-growing collection of (mostly) mirrored boxes. On the other hand upgrades are necessary in order for these older buildings to maintain their value.
It looks like they at least plan on preserving what may be the most typically mid-century element of the current design - the repetitive concrete panels on the north-facing facade that have a Vegas show room sort of starburst on them.

It certainly seems to be the most iconic portion of both the old and new designs.
I completely agree the re-skinning is usually the wrong route. But I'm going to say that this is a rare exception. See First Bank on N Meramec for a stupid stupid stupid re-skinning.

Here, I think HOK is going to put a lot of thought into the window composition. The devil is on the details here though. Would be interesting to see some material mock-ups and a detailed elevation drawing.
The new Porte-cochere is a fitting 21st Century MCM aesthetic. I agree that the renderings are very exciting.
aprice wrote:
Mon Jan 28, 2019 11:09 am
I agree that the renderings are very exciting.
I like your enthusiasm, but let's call this what it is: a new car port in front of the same blank white wall and front facing concrete facade, with a slight rearranging of the rectilinear pattern on the side of the building. Not a whole lot to get excited about.
framer wrote:
Sun Jan 27, 2019 11:39 am
I'm not a fan of re-skinning buildings. We lose the historical progression of design. What's unpopular today will be popular again in 40 years, and they'll just have to restore the original, historical facade; just like we're doing today on so many buildings that were re-skinned in mid-century. Can't we ever learn?
I think that this renovation will see this building stripped to the bare bones on the exterior and rebuilt so the chances of restoring the facade if this trend continues 40 years from now are low to non-existent. It will be interesting to see how the finished concept comes out.
stlgasm wrote: I like the windows in the new renderings, but I’d argue that the current facade looks “cleaner” than the modernized version- not sure why those accentuated horizontal lines between certain floors are necessary. In my opinion, it interrupts the skyward rhythm of the facade and makes the building look shorter. As Clayton’s skyline continues to expand, I think early specimens like this one from the first wave of high-rise construction provide context and contrast amidst an ever-growing collection of (mostly) mirrored boxes. On the other hand upgrades are necessary in order for these older buildings to maintain their value.
Excellent points being made here, especially the boldened part. In response to that, the north facing facade won't receive any changes so the early specimen is still there, just in an enhanced form. I don't know if the southern facade has the same detailing as the North, but if so, this renovation should be welcomed.