Transportation Catch All thread

All the ways we move people and things: trains, planes, automobiles, biking, walking, etc.
First unread post758 posts
This is being built elsewhere, but could also work here.

SkyTran:

-Ten times cheaper than LRT
-Physically unobtrusive
-Private car
-Can be built right into buildings
-Skip every stop until your destination
-50 mph in the city
-Environmentally friendly

https://m.facebook.com/skytran4stl/
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=YtkuM0m3Mvg
^Damn GC. Way to stay on message. You've been on team SkyTran for years now.
This is an interesting story from the RFT: For West County Restaurants, the Jobs Are Plentiful, But the Workers Are Few

The entire thing is worth reading, but here are some key quotes:
Six days each week, Marzette, 59, spends four hours on public transportation. It gets to him, he admits. But, he says, "I can't do nothing about it. Ain't got no car." He makes $9 an hour as a dishwasher.
Sam Garanzini, senior vice president of Pasta House, says he is considering offering bus passes to employees making the commute from the city to its locations in west county. But the company would only offer it to employees in particular scenarios, he adds. "It's not a policy that I'm going to wave in front of everybody," says Garanzini, who has worked for the local Italian chain for 50 years. "Because the next thing you know you'll have somebody taking a bus two blocks to get to work just so they can have a bus pass in their pocket. So it's going to be a policy that's used on an individual basis, as needed." And even if Pasta House begins offering free bus passes, that only solves part of the equation for employees. Long commutes are still a problem.
A lack of easy public transportation is a primary reason for the labor shortage, he agrees. Ninety percent of his employees in Ellisville come from the city, he says. And the large majority of them take the bus.
I think the framing of this is interesting as it is framed as a public transportation problem. All of the solutions discussed in the article still involve bussing low-wage workers from one end of the region to the other. Another way to look at it (not addressed at all in the article) is as a housing problem. Should the civic leaders profiled also be pressing for affordable housing in their communities (via section 8, subsidized housing, removing restrictive zoning that prohibits multifamily housing or small lot sizes, etc.)?
^Civic leaders in West County would not survive past the next election if they proposed anything of the type.
https://www.stltoday.com/news/local/gov ... op-story-1

Not that it comes as much of a surprise, but the Governor's new plan to fix bridges in Missouri is basically a gigantic redistribution of resources towards the rural parts of the state. There are some startling figures in the PD piece, but the fact that only 8% of the projects are from the St. Louis area is really something.
Great instead of paying for things we can pay for things plus interest.
We certainly can't acknowledge that our system is too big.
Nextstl - $100M Driving Subsidy Proposed While Gas Tax Cut Again

https://nextstl.com/2019/03/100m-drivin ... cut-again/
quincunx wrote:
Sun Mar 10, 2019 1:16 pm
Nextstl - $100M Driving Subsidy Proposed While Gas Tax Cut Again

https://nextstl.com/2019/03/100m-drivin ... cut-again/
Believe this pretty much defines the Federal Highway Trust Fund over the last decade or two. Congress appropriates x dollars, gas taxes come up short, and then congress puts some money into highway trust fund via general fund infusion as part of another bill. Congress of all politic stripes washes its hands and the vast majority of Americans somehow believe that highways are self supporting, not subsidized