Skinker DeBaliviere Infill and Rehab

Renovations and new construction in the Central Corridor -- defined by the area south of Delmar Avenue and North of Interstate 44/55.
First unread post208 posts
It sounds to me as though there are two separate units and she's legit, at present. But she's running into a "we don't want renters in our neighborhood" NIMBY backlash. (Since she's rented to more people in the past, and can't get that license change without the approval of her neighbors.) Which is . . . unbelievable in the west end of town. Absolutely unbelievable. You know, if you don't want to live near students, move the frick away from the school. End of sentence. Geemany. I hate people sometimes. I am so weary of people that think rental housing is the end of the world.
STLrainbow wrote:
Thu Dec 07, 2017 12:25 pm
I'm with the landlord on this.... 7 WashU students in the 7 rooms seems to be a good thing; who cares if they aren''t related?

Crackdown in Skinker-DeBaliviere Has Some Wash U Students Getting the Boot
https://www.riverfronttimes.com/newsblo ... g-the-boot

Density, please!
Who cares if they aren't related? Homeowners in the vicinity care.

I owned a home near a college in Columbus, OH. Parents of the college students were starting to buy up homes as an investment (prior to the 2008 crash, like many speculators were doing), and then turn around and sell them 4-5 years later. They would rent to other students and have their kids manage the place. This was a neighborhood where many younger children would walk to the local grade and junior high schools. Also an older community with a lot or retirees.

It didn't take long for loud music, outdoor drinking and fights breaking out on front lawns. Plus, with mom and dad away, the places would deteriorate very quickly, and home prices in the area were not keeping up with city average (before 2008).

So, yes. It can be a problem for the community.
Not allowing 3 or more unrelated people protects against drug and prostitution houses. If she wants to have 1 per bedroom she can apply for a boarding house occupancy permit.
The pitch forks are out over single family homes being turned into rentals, but if you're going to use the only 3 non-related in a living unit ordinance as an enforcement tool you can;t discriminate.

Some micro apts on DeBaliviere might help.

Or on the empty lot at Forest Park and Skinker. Of course the mansion dwellers would go crazy over that idea.
5700 McPherson has only one empty lot. Congrats to the Jaffe Group and buyers filling it back up.

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6007Pershing finished and 6001 underway

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^The one thing Skink-D was missing - 1950s-60s housing stock.
Thank goodness they didn't go with one big window upstairs on the corner house.

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5766 Pershing
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Yikes; 5766 looks like a modern version of a half-flounder.
Solar array

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quincunx wrote:
Sun Mar 11, 2018 1:58 pm
Solar array

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Nice. Not too complain....and a separate topic—with new construction, why is it so hard to plant street trees (and yard trees) in this city?
Any info on why the cecil whitakers closed?
shadrach wrote:
Sun Mar 11, 2018 6:32 pm
quincunx wrote:
Sun Mar 11, 2018 1:58 pm
Solar array

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Nice. Not too complain....and a separate topic—with new construction, why is it so hard to plant street trees (and yard trees) in this city?
That's the thing, it's really not. Property owners can go here and request that the city Forestry Division plant a new tree for you: https://www.stlouis-mo.gov/government/d ... oblems.cfm

There is no charge for the service.

-RBB
Thanks for posting, I keep forgetting about that.
I was aware back when I lived in St. Louis Hills about 14 years ago. Not an easy process then and there was about an 18 month wait time from request to planting. Not sure if that's changed.
They cut down a big street tree on my block yesterday. They're out doing another this morning. I hope for a good reason. It looks so much worse without them.
quincunx wrote:
Tue Mar 13, 2018 8:30 am
They cut down a big street tree on my block yesterday. They're out doing another this morning. I hope for a good reason. It looks so much worse without them.
Ash Tree? They've been cutting them everywhere due to the ash borer bug. Really a tragedy how many mature trees we will lose. They will replant with a 6-8' tall tree.
I guess, I'm not good at identifying tree species. Wish it was the Sweet Gum Borer or Cottonwood borer instead of the Emerald Ash Borer!

Hope the city is selling the Ash wood to baseball bat manufacturers.
I'm deeply curious if hedge apple/Osage orange would make a decent baseball bat. Like Ash, it's apparently good bow wood. Not sure that means it would make a decent bat. Might be too heavy. But it looks like we might need something sooner rather than later.
(Also, I feel your pain. I have two lovely mature trees directly in front of my house and a string of others that are more or less coeval up and down the street. I worry that they'll all end up as firewood at about the same time. We really need more diversity of both age and variety.)
quincunx wrote:
Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:44 am
I guess, I'm not good at identifying tree species.
Per MSU, you can identify Ash trees by a few characteristics:

They have opposite branching, i.e. twigs will sprout from both sides branches symmetrically:

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They have compound leaves, i.e. instead of one large leaf like a maple tree they'll have typically 5-9 smaller leaflets per leaf:

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And ash trees have a characteristic diamond pattern to their bark:

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Ash trees when mature will grow to be 50'-80' in height depending on the variety.

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-RBB
And since we're being nerdy, the species that's wreaking havoc is the Emerald Ash Borer, a native of northeast Asia. It was accidentally introduced to North America in the late '90s and has been spreading rapidly, originating in Michigan, since 2002.
There is also an Ash Borer that is native to North America, which is not wreaking havoc across the U.S. due to evolution of the Ash tree. Thanks Darwin.
symphonicpoet wrote:
Tue Mar 13, 2018 9:26 pm
(Also, I feel your pain. I have two lovely mature trees directly in front of my house and a string of others that are more or less coeval up and down the street. I worry that they'll all end up as firewood at about the same time. We really need more diversity of both age and variety.)
Had a 40-50' tree cut down not too long ago just about in front of my house and a smaller one next to it. We'll see if this summer will feel hotter in the house. Definitely changes the look on the street. Luckily my block only had a couple of these. Time to fancy up my yard I guess.
Bricks going up
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