Downtown Neighborhood Watch Training

Renovations and new residential construction in downtown St. Louis, Washington Avenue, the Old Post Office, etc.
The Safety Committee for the Downtown Neighborhood Association (DNA) is starting a downtown neighborhood watch and there will be a training session on Tuesday, May 26th (630pm to 730pm) at the Central Library (1301 Olive), in the training room (2nd floor). The idea for the neighborhood watch is to have citizens patrolling the streets on a regular basis and reporting issues (street lights being out, seeing the same people in certain area's that seem suspicious and illegal activities that are witnessed, etc) to the city. The neighborhood watch is not going to be confronting people if they see a problem. Any issues with people will be reported to the police. The size of the groups and the frequency will depend on the number of people that sign up to help. This is a simple way for people to make downtown a safer and better neighborhood for everyone. Please message me back with any questions.
That sounds like very weasely language. A continuous, regular patrol looking for broken street lights and pot holes?
^Agreed. Why not just join the neighborhood watch program instead?
The language seemed odd to me. I'd sign up for a neighborhood patrol, but not just to report broken street lights.

If we're reporting minor stuff, the main issues I have are with neglect and poor planning more than routine maintenance.

Sidewalks in downtown west that look like they've been bombed (S. side of Washington, near 21st. E. side of 22nd, near Schlafly).

Streets with 40mph traffic (Tucker, etc) that are huge safety and walkability issues.
Let me apologize for my poor choice of wording in the description above. I'm new to the idea of a Neighborhood Patrol, I've changed the title to Neighborhood Watch. It's my understanding that the Neighborhood Watch is based within the Neighborhood Ownership model that the city has adopted, the link is below. The idea of the watch is to have a group of citizens walking the neighborhood on a regular basis and looking for things that will have a negative effect on the safety of the neighborhood. My example of pot holes wasn't a good one. But street lights being out, seeing the same people in certain area's that seem suspicious and illegal activities that are witnessed. From what I've been told the training will educate the citizens on how to perform the patrol and the procedures when different activities are witnessed. I'm trying not to scare anyone who might think the Neighborhood Watch would confront people, that is left to the police. We're there to report activities that make the neighborhood unsafe. The police are the one's doing the training. Is that a better description?


(http://www.circuitattorney.org/docs/Nei ... tailed.pdf).
I actually didn't think the original description was all that strange. I think this sounds like a great step to take.
Of course it was strange. The police department was holding a training session to tell people how to walk around regularly on "patrols" and take note of broken lights and potholes (oh, and "etc.") ?

I mean, it's fine that you want to start neighborhood watch foot patrols, but as noted, it's probably best not to pretend it's something else.

The changed version makes a lot more sense. Thank you for clarifying.
bprop wrote:
Of course it was strange. The police department was holding a training session to tell people how to walk around regularly on "patrols" and take note of broken lights and potholes (oh, and "etc.") ?

I mean, it's fine that you want to start neighborhood watch foot patrols, but as noted, it's probably best not to pretend it's something else.

The changed version makes a lot more sense. Thank you for clarifying.


Nevermind, I guess I hadn't seen the original version.
Agreed on the transparency as to its actual purpose. I'm all for neighborhood patrols but let's be open and forward with the actual purpose.